django.urls functions for use in URLconfs

path()

path(route, view, kwargs=None, name=None)

Returns an element for inclusion in urlpatterns. For example:

from django.urls import include, path

urlpatterns = [
    path('index/', views.index, name='main-view'),
    path('bio/<username>/', views.bio, name='bio'),
    path('articles/<slug:title>/', views.article, name='article-detail'),
    path('articles/<slug:title>/<int:section>/', views.section, name='article-section'),
    path('weblog/', include('blog.urls')),
    ...
]

The route argument should be a string or gettext_lazy() (see Translating URL patterns) that contains a URL pattern. The string may contain angle brackets (like <username> above) to capture part of the URL and send it as a keyword argument to the view. The angle brackets may include a converter specification (like the int part of <int:section>) which limits the characters matched and may also change the type of the variable passed to the view. For example, <int:section> matches a string of decimal digits and converts the value to an int. See How Django processes a request for more details.

The view argument is a view function or the result of as_view() for class-based views. It can also be an django.urls.include().

The kwargs argument allows you to pass additional arguments to the view function or method. See Passing extra options to view functions for an example.

See Naming URL patterns for why the name argument is useful.

re_path()

re_path(route, view, kwargs=None, name=None)

Returns an element for inclusion in urlpatterns. For example:

from django.urls import include, re_path

urlpatterns = [
    re_path(r'^index/$', views.index, name='index'),
    re_path(r'^bio/(?P<username>\w+)/$', views.bio, name='bio'),
    re_path(r'^weblog/', include('blog.urls')),
    ...
]

The route argument should be a string or gettext_lazy() (see Translating URL patterns) that contains a regular expression compatible with Python’s re module. Strings typically use raw string syntax (r'') so that they can contain sequences like \d without the need to escape the backslash with another backslash. When a match is made, captured groups from the regular expression are passed to the view – as named arguments if the groups are named, and as positional arguments otherwise. The values are passed as strings, without any type conversion.

The view, kwargs and name arguments are the same as for path().

include()

include(module, namespace=None)[source]
include(pattern_list)
include((pattern_list, app_namespace), namespace=None)

A function that takes a full Python import path to another URLconf module that should be “included” in this place. Optionally, the application namespace and instance namespace where the entries will be included into can also be specified.

Usually, the application namespace should be specified by the included module. If an application namespace is set, the namespace argument can be used to set a different instance namespace.

include() also accepts as an argument either an iterable that returns URL patterns or a 2-tuple containing such iterable plus the names of the application namespaces.

Parameters:
  • module – URLconf module (or module name)
  • namespace (string) – Instance namespace for the URL entries being included
  • pattern_list – Iterable of path() and/or re_path() instances.
  • app_namespace (string) – Application namespace for the URL entries being included

See Including other URLconfs and URL namespaces and included URLconfs.

In older versions, this function is located in django.conf.urls. The old location still works for backwards compatibility.

register_converter()

register_converter(converter, type_name)[source]

The function for registering a converter for use in path() routes.

The converter argument is a converter class, and type_name is the converter name to use in path patterns. See Registering custom path converters for an example.

django.conf.urls functions for use in URLconfs

static()

static.static(prefix, view=django.views.static.serve, **kwargs)

Helper function to return a URL pattern for serving files in debug mode:

from django.conf import settings
from django.conf.urls.static import static

urlpatterns = [
    # ... the rest of your URLconf goes here ...
] + static(settings.MEDIA_URL, document_root=settings.MEDIA_ROOT)

url()

url(regex, view, kwargs=None, name=None)[source]

This function is an alias to django.urls.re_path(). It’s likely to be deprecated in a future release.

handler400

handler400

A callable, or a string representing the full Python import path to the view that should be called if the HTTP client has sent a request that caused an error condition and a response with a status code of 400.

By default, this is django.views.defaults.bad_request(). If you implement a custom view, be sure it returns an HttpResponseBadRequest.

handler403

handler403

A callable, or a string representing the full Python import path to the view that should be called if the user doesn’t have the permissions required to access a resource.

By default, this is django.views.defaults.permission_denied(). If you implement a custom view, be sure it returns an HttpResponseForbidden.

handler404

handler404

A callable, or a string representing the full Python import path to the view that should be called if none of the URL patterns match.

By default, this is django.views.defaults.page_not_found(). If you implement a custom view, be sure it returns an HttpResponseNotFound.

handler500

handler500

A callable, or a string representing the full Python import path to the view that should be called in case of server errors. Server errors happen when you have runtime errors in view code.

By default, this is django.views.defaults.server_error(). If you implement a custom view, be sure it returns an HttpResponseServerError.